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FAST, Fellows and CARB-X Update September 2020
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FAST & Fellows

GigaGen (FAST Spring 2015) used blood samples from 50 COVID-19 survivors to create an antibody treatment candidate.

Blood collected from survivors of COVID-19 has been used to identify antibodies against the disease, which have been turned into experimental drugs to fight it. But it’s not an easy process. So back in March, San Francisco startup GigaGen decided to test a technology it developed to rapidly identify Disease fighting antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus at the heart of the pandemic, and turn them into a drug to fight the disease.

Now the company says it has early evidence that the approach has yielded a promising drug candidate, GIGA-2050. When tested against the SARS-CoV-2 live virus, GIGA-2050 was 100 times more protective than plasma from survivors. Read more.

Applied Molecular Transport  (FAST Spring 14) a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced that the first patient has been dosed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter Phase 2a study evaluating the efficacy and safety of oral AMT-101 in patients with moderate to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC). AMT-101 is a gut-selective, oral, once-daily, biologic fusion protein of interleukin 10 (IL-10) which utilizes the company’s proprietary platform technology to harness the power of natural active transport mechanisms for a potentially more efficacious and safer biologic therapeutic.

“We are pleased with the speed at which we have launched this first Phase 2 clinical trial for AMT 101 in biologic-naïve and treatment-experienced UC patients, one trial in four that we have planned to evaluate the broad clinical potential of our lead drug candidate,” Read more.

CARB-X

CARB-X is awarding up to US$7.51 million to GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE: GSK), to develop a new drug to treat and prevent recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Read more.